Jaguar XF 25t

FastBlast

SN

THE JAGUAR XF range has received an update for the 2018 model year, primarily based around the roll-out of JLR’s latest ‘Ingenium’ engine family. A 2.0-litre turbo petrol is available in three states of tune, 147kW/320Nm 20t, 184kW/365Nm 25t and 221kW/400Nm 30t, with two diesels (132kW and 177kW) joining the carryover 3.0-litre sixcylinder S engines, a 280kW/450Nm supercharged petrol and grunty 221kW/700Nm turbo diesel. Tested here in 25t guise, the XF is a nice car, which isn’t meant to sound anywhere near as condescending as it does.

Simply put, the XF is very good in many areas without being standout.

Its party piece – probably the primary reason why you’d buy it over its conservative German opposition – is its looks. The sporty R-Sport is pictured here, however, our black Portfolio test car looked mature and classy; granted, it looks very similar to the smaller XE, but the design language seems to work more cohesively on the larger XF. The 2.0-litre turbo four looks the goods on paper (6.6sec 0-100km/h; 6.8L/100km) and is torquey enough for brisk acceleration, but it feels a little strangled at the top end suggesting the 221kW tune is the one for keener drivers.

Jaguar’s chassis is also well up for a punt, with accurate, well-weighted steering, fine handling balance and good body control. The interior lacks the latest gadgets of the new-gen Germans but works well enough, though the rotary gear selector needs to go. Pricing is also an issue, as while the base cost is sharp enough a long options list can quickly add up.

Choose wisely, but start with the 221kW engine.