TELFO

WE CHOSE 12 CARS FROM 1981 TO 1989 THAT REPRESENTED AS WIDE A VARIETY OF TRENDS AND STYLES AS POSSIBLE, TO REMEMBER AND CELEBRATE A TIME WHEN ‘STOCK SUCKED’

SIMON TELFORD

G’DAY, and welcome to the 35th anniversary issue of Street Machine. Thanks for slapping down your hard-earned grickles for it too. We know times are tight out there and appreciate your support for this crazy enterprise. In return, we work our backsides off to make sure you get maximum value for your spend. We hope you enjoy it and please let us know what you like, what you don’t and what we could do differently.

To celebrate our birthday milestone, we’ve pulled together a 58-page bonus mag, The Best of the 80s, and stuck it in the back, behind our regular contingent of features and columns.

It is made up of a selection of memorable feature cars, some politically incorrect vintage ads, and a couple of cool cartoons from the pens of Ralfus and BJ Akhurst. The guest editorial is the work of Redmond, a staple of our Your Stuff page, a Street Machine fan to his core and the scourge of Ford fans everywhere. Red is of a similar model year to me, and his thoughts on the December 1985 mag that he scored off eBay are a giggle.

So how do you do justice to that crazy decade in just one mag? With great difficulty, that’s how!

We spent hours flicking through those classic mags trying to narrow it down, but in the end we considered all those hardy souls of a certain age on social media who feel compelled to defend images of 80s street machines whenever they are pilloried by the young and the forgetful. Time and time again, they are forced to remind the unbelievers that there was once an era when flared guards were a sensible way to cover big rubber, velour trim was cool and Ford 12-slotters were an acceptable choice of rim for Holden owners.

With these brave defenders of the faith in mind, we chose 12 cars from 1981 to 1989 that represented as wide a variety of trends and styles as possible, to remember and celebrate a time when Stock Sucked – even if your ride was a GTHO. They range from the tough (Mick Curren’s Terminator Monaro) and the crazy (the Burrito Dorado Brougham) to the supernaturally clean (Howard Astill’s Rock Solid II). Even so, there are plenty of genres that were part of 80s Street Machine that we couldn’t in, including four-pots of Japanese and Euro origin, full-tilt race cars more than a few deadstock Yank classics. And doubt, we’ve missed some of your favourites we certainly missed plenty of ours, including Greg Carlson’s evil ute, Wayne Pagel’s Monaro and Owen Webb’s XY, to name just few.

And while we doubt that we will have done much to stop the tide disbelief and outrage every time a picture of Trans Am-fronted HQ pops up on Facebook, we’ll be happy if some of our younger readers come away with a bit of an insight into the amazing 80s.

Thanks to everyone who helped make it happen. Enjoy! s w Mach fit in both orig and stoc no som – ple Gr WB HT We a f A th m of ev a p w o c b t T w

WE CHOSE 12 CARS FROM 1981 TO 1989 THAT REPRESENTED AS WIDE A VARIETY OF TRENDS AND STYLES AS POSSIBLE, TO REMEMBER AND CELEBRATE A TIME WHEN ‘STOCK SUCKED’