NIP AND TUCK

SILVER ACES CUSTOM METAL FABRICATION BOSS, CHAD ATKINSON, SHOWS YOU HOW TO GIVE YOUR CLASSIC STREETER A CLEANER LOOK BY TUCKING THE BUMPERS

STORY & PHOTOS CHAD ATKINSON

THE factory fitment of steel bumpers on classic cars was often woeful at best. Huge gaps were deliberately left by the factory to reduce the risk of the bumper your bodywork if you were to give something a little nudge. Thankfully, this is pretty easily rectified by realigning and tucking your bumpers, which can really help with the overall flow and visual aesthetics of your vehicle. To illustrate this, we’ll look at the techniques used to tuck a rear bumper on an XC sedan.

The bumper mounting brackets bolt from the vehicle to the bumper reinforcement. We want to move the bumper 15mm up and 18mm inwards, so an 18mm-wide section at the bottom of each bracket side is marked out with tape, cut and removed. What remains is moved 15mm upwards. Everything is then given a chamfer and tack-welded into place

The lowest bracket hole is then slotted to accommodate the lower lug of the bumper. The middle two holes are aligned with the reinforcement and the reinforcement is then drilled to suit. Some nuts are welded on the back for the middle bolts as per factory

Everything is then bolted back together once again and fitted to the Falcon. A few millimetres are shaved off both ends of the bumper to better suit the body contour. Once the fitment looks good, the bumper is removed again and disassembled, and everything then gets TIG-welded. A MIG will also suffice; turn up the heat for maximum penetration. After a quick sand/grind and metal-file, things are now looking spot-on