SKYLINES AUSTRALIA VICTORIA

IT’S ONE OF AUSTRALIA’S LONGEST-RUNNING NISSAN CLUBS, AND LIKELY ONE OF THE MOST PROLIFIC OUTSIDE OF JAPAN

Barry Ashenhurst

Skylines Australia at large is one of the longest-running Nissan clubs in the country – and likely one of the most enduring, engaged and prolific marque clubs outside of Japan.

Nissan performance vehicles have been popularly imported for decades here in Australia, whereas other countries either never got – or are only just now getting their hands on them. That makes the national online forums a gold mine of information, support and advice that draws members from all over the world.

SAU has smaller chapters in each state, run largely independently and putting on numerous social and motorsport activities such as track days, sprint days and DECA/motorkhana events.

Becoming a member of SAU Victoria sees you gain CAMS affiliation through the club, exclusive member discounts from various club partners and supporters, as well as invites to exclusive members-only events such as their annual Great Ocean Road cruise, DECA Motorkhana series, Track Championship series, monthly general meetings, mini cruises, BBQs, go-karting nights and many more.

Tony Olsson President

club@sauvic.com.au

Skylines Australia Victoria Inc.

PO BOX 2045, Seaford. Vic 3198

ABANDONISTAS

We owe a debt of gratitude to the muck-encrusted vermin who steal cars, and then by dint of cunning and black of night, set fire to them as a means of attaining empowerment. Tribal shenanigans are such fun. And nothing complements a pleasant vista like a charred wreck.

I found what I think is this Nissan crew-cab ute on the Putty Road between Singleton and Syderney. The Putty Road used to be infamous for truck fatalities, just about once a week when I was a transport journo. Now it’s infamous for motorcycle fatalities, so only the names and the speeds reached at apogee have changed.

The ute was delivered to the top of a hill overlooking the Putty and subjected to a thorough ratting. The only part I recognised was the Dell computer in the back seat. Also present was an ominous looking package, wrapped in animal skin, tied with rope and placed on the chassis for us to ponder. After ratting, the vehicle was subjected to heat of such intensity that it created the perfect billboard for graffitists, as someone smarter than me has already pointed out, those among us who possess a limited vocabulary but find it sufficient to express their range of ideas.

I took pictures but refused to prod the ominous package down the back.

Barry Ashenhurst