Ingear

Lexus World Clock $TBC

They say time waits for no man, but American singer-songwriter Tom Waits’ drummer Shelly Manne was reportedly not the most punctual band member so, on at least one occasion, Tom did in fact wait for Manne. In recognition of Masafumi Ishikawa’s Lexus Design Awardwinning timepiece, Lexus is putting this ultra-minimalist World Clock into production. Pricing has not yet been finalised, but as it is constructed using the same carbonfibre sheet found in the highest-performance Lexus models, you can bet it won’t be cheap. An arrival date is also unconfirmed but it will be worth the wait.

Lexus World Clock $TBC craftedforlexus.com

Generally speaking, hardback books tend to be more expensive than softbacks. So it shouldn’t be surprising that when you bind a book in leather, encase it in metal, top it with a pair of wrinkle-coated V12 rocker covers and stand the whole thing on a ridiculous handbent chromed tubular exhaust manifold pedestal, the price blows out to the cost of a Ford Mondeo. Il Fascino Ferrari offers an insight into seven decades of prancing horse history through previously unseen pictures and documents, but you’ll likely be too busy with Brasso to actually turn a page.

Il Fascino Ferrari Collector’s Edition book $36,600 taschen.com

Were you the kid at school who failed to get your pen licence and was banned from using the pointy scissors? Well, you’ll love these new super-simple Quick Build kits from Airfix. Unlike the company’s traditional cut-out-andassemble kits which need all kinds of dangerous things like glue and paint, the new range of car and plane kits simply snap together in minutes. Suitable for ages five and up, they’re perfect for budding young transport enthusiasts who like to keep their little hands busy.

Airfix quick build kits $26.95 airfix.com

Displaying a half-scale model of a Formula 1 Pirelli P Zero on your bookshelf would be cool enough, but Italian electronics authority Ixoost has taken the mini wheel and tyre combo – actually used in wind-tunnel testing – and turned it into a Bluetooth speaker. The centre houses a silk tweeter, behind it sits a 100mm midwoofer and the whole thing is driven by a 100-watt amp. Until the FOM comes to its senses and reintroduces naturally aspirated V10 engines, this is possibly the only way an F1 car is going to sound good.

Ixoost Pirelli P Zero Sound Pod $3900 ixoost.it

Stemming from the partnership between Aston Martin and TAG Heuer is this automatic chronograph based on the 45mm Carrera Heuer-01. Its large case sits prominently on the wrist, and differs to others in the range with parallel lines engraved into the sides of its stainless-steel centre. It features a black ceramic bezel and houses a standout open honeycomb ‘semi-skeleton’ dial. Available on a black rubber strap only, it’s a highlight of the line-up.

TAG Heuer Carrera Heuer-01 Aston Martin $8450 tagheuer.com

Traser claims to be the inventor self-illumination technology, born out of a supply deal with the US military. Its timepieces feature a special compound called Trigalight on the hands and hour indices that illuminates the dark without having been exposed to a light source. The P67 Officer Pro is one of Traser’s most attractive models, shown here in more affordable quartz format, though automatic variants also exist.

Traser P67 Officer Pro GunMetal $586 swisstimehq.com.au

A GMT is often the watch of choice for jetsetters, with its extra hand allowing quick references of a different time zone. The Longines Conquest now has such a complication, with a robust quartz movement, five-year battery life and a unique ‘Flash Setting’ feature that bridges the gap between mechanical timepieces and modern smartwatches. A phone app is used to set the times with the camera flash alone. Sound weird? YouTube it.

Longines Conquest V.H.P. GMT Flash Setting $1750 longines.com.au