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GO AHEAD, TELL US WHAT YOU REALLY THINK

But please, keep it tight (no more than 200 words) and do include your suburb if via email: wheels@wheelsmag.com.au You can also have your say on Facebook (search for Wheels Australia), Instagram or Twitter

SEDATELY ORIENTED

LETTER OF THE MONTH

BOTH MAZDA AND Toyota have been hinting for years about the introduction of performance versions to their Mazda 3 and Corolla ranges, but this pair seem to be all hot air and no action. Perhaps Mazda and Toyota should look at the sales success of the Golf GTI and R models which account for around 30 percent of all Golf sales in Australia. This clearly shows that there is a sizeable market for high-spec performance models in Australia.

“ MAZDA AND TOYOTA SEEM TO BE ALL HOT AIR AND NO ACTION

If Mazda is looking to push the new 3 further upmarket, then the 3 needs an equivalent GTI or R model to do this. Unless the new Skyactiv-X engine offers comparable performance to the Golf GTI (180kW and 370Nm), the company has missed the mark in terms of offering a performance alternative. Meanwhile, Toyota already has a ready engine in the 8AR-FTS 2.0-litre turbo, so it has no excuses.

Could be time for you to take that product planning job at Mazda, Robert. The Mazda 3 is engineered for AWD, the company has a 2.5-litre turbo engine making 170kW/420 Nm, so you’d think a hot version would be a no-brainer – Ed

Robert Ius, Haberfield, NSW

LETTER OF THE MONTH PRIZE

To Robert Ius for saying what we were all thinking, a year’ subscription to the new-look Wheels. And yes, we did ask Mazda about the 2.5-litre in the 3 at the Geneva Show!

KEEPING HIS OPTIONS OPEN

BOY, YOU GUYS can give me the irrits sometimes. have an order in for the updated Porsche Macan S, and yes, there are lots of options one can choose. prefer it that way so can spec the car want.

In April’s edition, Cameron Kirby reviews the facelifted Macan and says AEB shouldn’t be an option on this vehicle; it should be standard at this price point. Really? Cameron, let me tell you don’t want AEB, nor do want the active cruise control it is bundled with. As an involved and ‘present’ driver, they both drive me insane with their interventions.

This is one of the reasons bought the Porsche and not something else in this category which has these things as standard.

Keep the options list alive, please, Porsche. Some of us want to remain engaged in our driving rather than have our car make decisions for us, because they aren’t always good ones!

Paul Ainsworth, Sydney NSW

“ ROAD SAFETY: WE SHOULD BE ADDRESSING THE CAUSE, NOT THE SYMPTOM

MUSTANG’S KINDA SALLY LOOKIN’

I AM A happy owner of a 2017 Mustang GT and an avid follower of the V8 Supercars.

I am really ticked off with what V8 Supercars have done to the Mustang to make it comply with their rules. It now looks more like a little Aussie race car, but worst of all it’s been forced to use a basically 50-year-old pushrod engine.

I’ve been following Aussie motor racing for 60 years. It’s been fantastic with all the different makes, sports sedans, Formula 5000 and the rest. But best of all are the historic touring cars of yesteryear, as they are genuine cars we can relate to. V8 Supercars has lost the plot.

Robert Doust, Hamersley, WA

LIMITERS ARE THE ABSOLUTE LIMIT

YET AGAIN WE are facing nanny-state intervention from a few bureaucrats with nothing better to do. Imposing speed limiters on vehicles is ridiculous, arrogant and plain dangerous. It demonstrates the contempt that politicians the world over have for us, the people they are supposed to represent.

Instead of legislating for cars to have on-board police officers, how about we legislate that cars can only be sold to suitably qualified people? Introduce driver training at schools, then implement a regime of mandatory skills and knowledge testing at regular intervals for all drivers. If people only want to have a licence that lets them drive handbags around our congested cities, that’s fine, they can. But for people who want to drive faster, more powerful cars, on open roads, across long distances, then give them the opportunity to train and develop experience before they can do so.

Every form of motorsport requires you to progress through various tests and experience levels before you can proceed to faster (ergo typically more dangerous) categories. The same principle applies to operators of heavy vehicles, plant equipment, buses, planes and boats. Yet we continue to let young drivers, new Australians and foreign tourists come here with little to no driver training or testing.

When it comes to the death toll on our roads, we should be addressing the cause, not the symptom. That is, driver behaviour, attitude and ability – or put another way, stupidity, arrogance and ignorance.

We agree, Darcy. Driver training and attitudes here are often lamentable. That needs to change – Ed

Darcy M, Canberra, ACT

“Is this the way to The Bend?”

FORD 4x4s SPOTTED IN SA

An eagle-eyed Wheels reader sent through this image that shows two camouflaged Ford Bronco mules testing around the Mount Gambier area in South Australia. Another Wheels spy later confirmed the cars were en route to Tailem Bend.

LEXCISED

SO THERE I was, my new edition of Wheels (April edition) in my letter box. When opened up the issue, was delighted to learn the new BMW 3 Series was roadtested on Australian roads (‘Rule of Three’).

It was a fascinating read. Even better, the article gave a tease of what was to come in the next story. A comparison of the new Beemer against its rivals (‘G20 Summit’). Having recently bought a Lexus IS 300 F Sport Luxury, you can imagine my anticipation to race through to the comparison.

But alas, what got was the motoring equivalent of Eurovision. The BMW was up against the Merc C300, Audi’s A4 45 TFSI quattro and the Jaguar XE 30T 300 Sport. All Europeans (Britain hasn’t Brexited just yet).

What gives, Wheels? Where was the Lexus? You even mentioned in the comparison that Lexus should be flattered by the newest from Bavaria, so why couldn’t we see how it stacked up in performance? Surely the best of Japan should be tested against the best of Europe?

We wanted the Lexus in that test, Craig, but sadly the logistics didn’t line up – Ed

VIRAL NEWS

JUST ADDING ANOTHER layer to the mystique of the ‘Supercar Scare’ Alex mentioned in his column last issue. The ‘scare’ killed the Australian performance production cars of the era, but it nearly didn’t happened. The headline on the front page of the Sun Herald was not the original lead story.

After the first edition hit the streets, the editor had a call from above instructing him to remove the lead story before the next edition.

At short notice the editor scoured the paper for an alternate story and came across an article buried in the motoring section about concerns regarding the local development of 140mph cars. The story grew legs of its own – today it would be described as going viral.

Evan Green wrote a follow-up article raising a more poignant concern: that mum and dad’s V8 Premier or Fairmont, with vastly less ability than the XU1, HOs or E49s and in much larger numbers, could still hit 100mph.

Mike Riordan, Campsie, NSW

Green was right. Follow this link to discover why faster cars are often safer cars: bit.ly/supercarcrash – Ed

Craig Sullivan, Canberra, ACT