Charged pony

FORD TAKES ITS FULL EV SUV AND GIVES IT GRUNT WORTHY OF THE ICONIC BADGE ON THE GRILLE

CAMERON KIRBY

FORD IS taking a big risk with the Mustang Mach-E – and that’s just with its name. So how do you convince heartland enthusiasts to get onboard with a controversial new electric SUV that has piggybacked your most iconic nameplate? Build an unhinged tyredestroying monster of course.

Enter the Mach-E 1400 (pictured), developed by Ford Performance in conjunction with champion drifter Vaugh Gittin Jr (think Ken Block with more facial hair and a healthier trophy cabinet). Built starting with the Mach-E body-in-white, all the hanging panels are carbonfibre, bar the bonnet which is made from an experimental organic composite material.

Powering the 2270kg prototype is a 56.8kW battery weighing around 680kg. Small in capacity, the unit is high in power density and made of lithium nickel manganese cobalt oxide pouch cells. The 1400 in the name denotes its power output in horsepower – roughly 1000kW. Torque is said to be in the region of 2000Nm before it reaches the diffs.

Delivering that power are no fewer than seven motors. Three are attached to the front differential, and four on the rear, with a single driveshaft linking motors on the respective axles. Ford runs two separate cooling systems, one for each motor bank, using oil and water cooling in tandem, with air directed from beneath the car.

Torque is said to be in the region of 2000Nm before it reaches the diffs

The noise the 1400 emits is deeply unpleasant – like having a dentist drill piercing your skull. A powerful military-grade speaker in the rear bumper can be used to drown the motors out. Is it enough to convince fans to fall in love with the Mustang badge’s most radical model yet?

CAMERON KIRBY

IN FOCUS

LEARN TO DRIFT BEFORE YOU VECTOR

RIMAC WON’T RELY ON TRICKY TECH FOR THRILLS

RIMAC’S SECOND all-electric hypercar the C_Two (final name TBD) is nearing production. CEO Mate Rimac is adamant the 1408kW/2300Nm EV needs to thrill without electronic driver aids. “We are not going to compensate the vehicle dynamics with a torque vectoring algorithm. The car has to drift and slide and drive really well on its own, before we put torque vectoring on it,” he said in a recent video. This was promptly followed by test t driver Miroslav Zrn?evi? ripping some extravagant smoky slides. Just don’t call Hammond.